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I'm just a bill. Yes, I'm only a bill. And I'm sitting here on Capitol Hill. Well, it's a long, long journey to the capital city. It's a long, long wait while I'm sitting in committee, but I know I'll be a law someday, at least I hope and pray that I will, but today I am still just a bill.
~ Bill

Bill is the main character of the music video I'm just a Bill one of the most recognizable characters from the musical cartoon series School House Rock! As implied by his name, he is an anthropomorphic bill awaiting to hear if the president chooses to sign or veto, thus determining if he will become a law.

Role

Bill's story teaches viewers about the process of of how a bill is created and how it becomes (or does not become) a law.

Bill is seen sitting on the step of capital hill, awaiting his fate of either becoming or not becoming a law. An unnamed boy walks up to him and asks why he feels so sad. He then goes on explain to him that "I'm Just a Bill" and that "I know I'll be a law someday," and that "I hope and pray that I will" but reminds the boy that he is still just a bill.

According to the song, he is a bill that if approved, makes it a requisite for school buses to stop at railroad crossings, thus improving traffic safety.

He goes on to explain in several verses that he was created by a district representative who then when on to promote the bill in campaigns and then send it off to Congress. It is revealed that both houses unanimously approved the bill the sent him off to the president (the position he is in at that point in the video), who will need to either sign it or veto it. Bill mentions that most bills do not come this far and that he is one of "the lucky ones".

At the end of the video, the same representative that proposed Bill at the beginning of the video comes out from the U.S. Capitol and reveals that the president has signed him, and that he is now officially a law. Causing all three to celebrate Bill's success.

Trivia

  • In real life, no such bill was ever created, although it is a common practice for school buses to stop at railroads to listen for trains.
  • In real life, if the president veto the bill, there is still one more chance for the bill to become law. If both the Houses of Representatives and the Senate approve to override the president's veto, then the rejected bill becomes law, otherwise it fades from existence.

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Schoolhouse Rocky | Conductor | Bill | Interplanet Janet | Lucky Seven Sampson | Zero

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